Thursday, October 14, 2010

Handi Quilter Retreat, Installment #2

I should entitle this post "Quilts Everywhere". But seriously, should I have expected anything less?? Of course not. It was fun to see all of the quilts that I recognize from HQ magazine ads all over their walls, and then some. The one below is from Brenda's office, and a book of her's too (I think). Though you cannot see the quilting, it is truly gorgeous. I love combining the very traditional patterns into a more artistic quilt.

The 2-story ground floor/entryway has many great quilts hanging. Here's just a few. I could use my entire blogger memory if I posted all of them.

And did you really think that I'd go to the bathroom and not bring my camera?...ha ha. Both bathrooms are decorated with no less than 5 quilts each. Seriously, you gotta love this place. It is a mecca of inspiration at every turn.
Both days of the retreat were filled with creative quilting lessons. On Monday morning, we took T-N-T...thread, needles and tension. The lecture was started with a larger-than-life model of a quilting needle (which I should have taken a picture of). It was about 18" long and 1.5" in diameter! The thread discussion was good, since I have become mostly fixated on using Superior's So Fine thread because if its ease of use and the fact that it rarely breaks. I rarely take the time to retension for other threads. After the lecture, we were given a bag of 8 very different threads, and had to tension our machine for each, and in a specific order. They were not in an easy order either! We did a metallic, poly-nylon, silk, King Tut, a couple of YLI threads and a So Fine. It was a great exercise. These threads we did not get to bring home, but we did get a nice bag of Superior and YLI threads as a gift. It also covered some basics on continuous-line quilting in the afternoon. My continuous-line snowmen and other things were not the most sightly stitching I have ever done! After dinner Monday evening, Suzanne Hyland (CEO Mark Hyland's wife) did a session on quilt design. Most people really loved how she held up several quilts and showed why or why not custom quilting is not a good decision. Learning to read a quilt is an acquired skill for most people, and for some I have learned, it just never happens. I feel fortunate to be able to see quilt potential and possibilities for quilting designs quite readily. I like to see how other good quilters choose to quilt pieces. More often, my problem comes with the battle between quilting what the quilt needs and what the client's budget is! I have done Carla Barrett's Quilt Whisperer class, and so love the approach she takes with students, and where to look for inspiration. Anything I learn above that is just gravy from here on out. Tuesday's lesson was on ruler work. When I first started quilting, I HATED ruler work. Slowly it has grown on me. This particular lesson was really good too. Of course it didn't hurt that these 4 fantastic educators (below) gave us the motherload of rulers and templates! More on that in another Installment of this retreat. These ladies are each very talented, and do a really good job of conveying knowledge to people of all abilities. Kudos to them!
(and dontcha just love that quilt behind the educators?!)
Here's the posh quilting studio...To see 18 longarm machines is to make me drool uncontrollably! It's beyone my wildest dreams! And naturally, there were quilts on all walls of this space too.
Are you bored with this yet??...Hope not, I have at least 2 more days of this. Just wait until you get to hear about my "Fun with TSA" post...
Have a good Thursday! I have recovered enough from my busy trip and redeye flight to probably start a twin quilt this afternoon! Joy to all~

5 comments:

Ellen said...

I'm so glad you're sharing this with us! Its marvelous to see all their quilts on display and must have been a wonderful experience! Looking forward to more.

Strlady said...

Such fun! I love the bathroom quilt... weird to say that, lol!
I know what you mean about having to balance what you see the quilting could be and what the client tells you to do. I don't think I could do it. It's like piecing someone elses quilt with thier 'chosen' fabrics. You know that pattern would look FABULOUS in civil war repros and they send you florals. UGH. Was curious which HQ do you use? I actually thought of buying the sit down model many years ago but I hate quilting, so why even go there?LOL! Plus, you do it so well for me!

Emma said...

OMG, that quilt studio is breath-taking! I just need room for one...

kwiltmakr said...

What lovely quilts there. Sounds like you are learning so much and all the gifts wow, how wonderful.

Margo said...

Hi Margaret! Thanks so much for sharing your excellent adventure! Glad you like the quilt on the wall behind the educators, 'cause I made it! It was donated to the MQS auction last May and the HQ educators purchased it! Made my day!!!